Author guidelines

1. An article may be submitted in Afrikaans or English. The desired length for an article is between 4 000 en 12 000 words. 
2. A copy of the typed article must be submitted in electronic format (MS Word) to the Editorial Office. All illustrations, figures, and tables must be placed within the text at the appropriate points, rather than at the end. 
3. An edited (proofread) article on any relevant topic, well presented and written in easy understandable style, will be considered for publishing on the understanding that they are the original work of the authors named, and that they are being offered only to Acta Structilia.
4. Tables and figures: There should be no more than 10 figures and tables in total per article. All captions must be provided in the text. Abbreviations/acronyms used in figures and tables must be explained in the heading/legend or footnote. Figures must be provided as high-resolution images in TIFF format (avoid compressed formats like GIFF and JPEG). Ensure that your figures will be clear and legible when reduced in size.Tables must be submitted in editable format in Word or Excel and not as image files. Excel files should be uploaded as individual sheets, not the entire workbook.
5. The Editor-in-Chief reserves the right to alter the article(s) where necessary with regard to the style and presentation of the publication. If extensive alterations are advised by adjudicators the article(s) will be returned to the author. 
6. Copyright is transferred to the author(s) when an article is accepted for publication 
7. Article content must be written in Microsoft Word, Ariel, font size 12, single spacing. 
8. Titles must be short and concise, but informative. Supply suitable headings and sub-headings where necessary. The title must be in both Afrikaans and English. 
9. A short abstract (between 200-250 words), in both Afrikaans and English, must be provided at the beginning of the text.
10. Applicable keywords in Afrikaans and English must be given after the summary. 
11. The summary should start with 2–3 sentences that provide an introduction to the field and the particular problem investigated, followed by a one-sentence statement of your main findings (or conclusions, in the case of a Review Article), and a further 2–3 sentences placing these findings/conclusions in a general context so that readers are made aware of the implications of the findings. Summary paragraphs typically do not include references.
12. Literature reviews should identify international research on similar topics and indicate a clear gap in research articles related to international cutting edge research. Authors should clearly demonstrate how their research relates to that of other scholars on similar topics.
13. The significance of the main findings or conclusions should not be a summary of the results, but should reflect the contribution the results make to the field, and how the results are applicable in their respective field and in other fields. The points of significance should start with general contributions and proceed with more specific contributions. The significance of the findings will be published with the aim of promoting greater interest not only from readers in the field but also from a wider readership. The points of significance should therefore be written for a non-specialist.
14. Use Arabic numbers with full stops in between for headings and subheadings, i.e. 1. followed by 1.1 and 1.1.1 up to a maximum of three levels. After that use a) etc. 
15. Source references in the text must be in the Harvard style of referencing (Author, date: pages). i. e. (Schleien, 2006: 20-40). 
16. Foot- and endnotes are likewise done in the Harvard style of referencing. 
17. The references list (Harvard style of referencing) should contain all the relevant information, and be listed alphabetically according to the names of the authors. i. e. Sun, M. & Howard, R. 2004. Understanding I.T. in construction. London: Spon Press. 
18. URLs for the references of internet documents cited in the text and listed in the references must accompany the article. 
19. Quotations are not in italics and must be written in double inverted commas. Inserts in quotations are placed in block brackets. Quotations longer than three lines are indented and are placed without quotations marks. 
20. Avoid uncommon abbreviations and acronyms. Abbreviations should be limited to those in general use. Names of corporations, etc are at first written out in full with the abbreviation in brackets after which the abbreviated form may be used. 
21. Italics are preferred for stereotyped Latin terms such as per se and for words in other languages. 
22. Use single inverted commas to emphasise words or phrases. 
23. Details concerning the origin of the article should be indicated, i.e if it was presented at a congress. An article will only be referred to the panel of referees if the author clearly states that it had not received prior publication and is not under consideration for publication elsewhere; also that the research has not been submitted for publication nor has it been published in whole or in part elsewhere.
24. Authors may submit the names and addresses of three scholars (experts) in his field (not members at own place of work) as possible adjudicators. 
25. The author(s) will receive two complimentary copies of the relevant issue of Acta Structilia
26. The article must contain the title, qualifications and affiliations of the author(s), the address, telephone and facsimile numbers and if possible, the email address. 
27. The Author Agreement Form must be completed, signed and return to the Editorial office.
Editorial address
The Editor-in-Chief: Acta Structilia 
Internal Post Box 47 
University of the Free State 
PO Box 339 9300 
Bloemfontein 
South Africa 
E-mail address: struct@ufs.ac.za